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HomeUKLismore savings should only be used after a community acquisition

Lismore savings should only be used after a community acquisition

  • Lismore store crucial for locals
  • Fundraising surpasses expectations
  • Community saves island shop

A buyout funded by an island community has preserved the sole shop and post office.

Earlier this year, the closure of the Lismore store was a concern when the educator in charge of its operations returned to the classroom.

The Lismore Community Trust (LCT) gained the support of more than 230 supporters and £80,000 in donations through a share issue campaign.

They now intend to establish a central center for the 160 permanent inhabitants of the Inner Hebrides island.

Exceeding Funding Goals

Initially, the Trust intended to raise £70,000 to finance the acquisition of initial inventory, renovations, and business operations for approximately five years.

The final sum, however, surpassed £82,000 and continued to increase due to contributions from holiday homeowners, regular visitors, and neighbors.

Andy Hough, chairman of the LCT, stated that the store’s continued operation was crucial to preserving the island’s capacity to supply locals without requiring them to travel three hours to Oban.

“The closure of the store would have had catastrophic consequences for a considerable number of services,” he stated.

“Our fragile population was already at risk, and that sense of isolation would have been exacerbated. It constituted the inception of depopulation.

“However, witnessing individuals from various backgrounds band together in an effort to foster a sense of community spirit—whether they were second homeowners or permanent residents—was encouraging.”

The provision of doorstep delivery for goods has prevented individuals from having to depart the island via ferry.

This week marked the ribbon-cutting ceremony on the island, which is situated northeast of Mull off the west coast of Scotland, with nearly half of its population in attendance.

Although full-time employees will staff the store, volunteers will assist with business operations.

Mr. Hough, 66, who retired from the Isle of Wight to Lismore in 2018, expressed his desire for the store to attract local community members by, among other things, implementing WiFi.

However, he noted that the Trust aimed to maintain a “profitable” business.

He explained that it is a place where individuals purchase supplies and can also congregate, converse, and discover the bizarre.

“A manager of ours is the parent of two young children. They make purchases in the business, which is how we reimburse them.

Although it is inherently a service, we wish to ensure it does not incur a financial loss.

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