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HomeScienceAttenborough's Wild Isles shows us our own "amazing" nature.

Attenborough’s Wild Isles shows us our own “amazing” nature.

There has never been a more crucial time, according to Sir David Attenborough, to invest in the local environment.

According to him, wildlife in the British Isles can be just as “dramatic and magnificent” as elsewhere.

The 96-year-old illuminates local natural history for the first time after filming nature films all over the world.

Since 1970, nearly half of the British fauna species have declined.

Attenborough's Wild Isles shows us our own "amazing" nature.

Sir David says while filming on location at a puffin colony on Skomer Island off the west coast of Wales. “Though rich in locations, Britain as a whole is one of the most nature-depleted countries in the world.”

“Never has there been a more essential time to invest in our wildlife – to try and set an example for the rest of the world and restore our once wild isles for future generations.”

The TV host and naturalist is renowned for his acclaimed wildlife series such as Blue Planet. Which has been credited with motivating action on issues such as plastic pollution.

He regrets spending so much time on foreign natural history shows instead of local fauna.

Sir David is currently narrating a five-part series that seeks to highlight the challenges affecting nature in the British Isles and alert audiences to the extinction of species on their doorstep.

The show’s producers said Sir David agreed to narrate Wild Isles and was asked to present it. Because of his rare perspective on how the British countryside has changed during his lifetime of almost a century.

Alistair Fothergill, a series producer who has worked with David Attenborough for 35 years, wanted to draw attention to the internationally significant fauna and habitats on our islands, from seabirds to chalk streams.

“We are globally important for nature – and I don’t believe many people in Britain appreciate that,” he said.

“It was very essential to us to say, this [nature] is precious, but at the same time it’s fragile.”

Camera crews ventured out for months to film rarely-seen animal behavior working with the latest technology such as drones and slow-motion cameras.

They captured moments of high drama, such as orcas pursuing seals off the coast of Scotland and white-tailed eagles chasing a flock of barnacle geese. In a behavior that has never been captured on film in the British Isles, the birds. Which are making a comeback in the UK, were observed dragging a goose from the sky.

Over three years, staff toured 145 locations to showcase our backyard’s natural beauty.

The series also looks at little-known natural history, like how flies pollinate forest plants.

The first episode’s producer, Hilary Jeffkins, stated that these intimate, small-scale stories were equally crucial to unraveling.

“These are stories that are at our doorsteps,” she said. We can take a look when we are out for a stroll.

Scientific advisor on the series, Dr. Philip Wheeler of the Open University, said he hoped the programs would stimulate public awareness of nature loss close to home.

The series is published shortly after nearly 200 nations pledged to protect 30% of the world’s lands and seas for nature by 2030 at the United Nations’ nature summit in Montréal.

“I believe it can make a significant difference in terms of altering the conversation and narrative,” Dr. Wheeler said.

“This conversation extends beyond nature enthusiasts and the conservation community; it also involves the general public and the political arena.”

The series was co-produced and co-funded by the Open University, and two conservation organizations, WWF and RSPB.

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